Alexx Kay On Researching ‘After Tombstone’

Walter Brennan as Newman Clanton
Walter Brennan as Newman Clanton in My Darling Clementine

Over at LiveJournal annotator Alexx Kay rambles on the process of annotating the Moore/O’Neill tale “After Tombstone” in Cinema Purgatorio #7:

Alan Moore’s story in Cinema Purgatorio, “After Tombstone”, is pretty complex for the roughly 6 pages it takes to vivisect the gunfight at the OK Corral. I’m no expert on the subject, but I’m a lot closer now than I was a month ago, having spent a lot of time reading Wikipedia and watched the three main movies that Moore seems to be drawing on for this story … None of these four sources agree with each other about what was really going on. And then, the clearly unreliable narrator of Moore’s story has yet a fifth account.

It seems to me that what Moore is getting at here is not just the now-familiar concept that history is another kind of fiction. Rather, that fiction overwrites history, often repeatedly. History becomes palimpsest, a hologram of all the different versions refracting with each other at once. As Dave Sim once quoted Moore as saying, “All stories are true.”

Of course, as we see in “After Tombstone”, this process of overwriting is an extremely violent one. Corpses are left on the street whenever it happens. In Moore’s eternalist view of the universe, however, being shot full of holes in no way prevents (or allows) those bodies to not continually repeat their roles. Dead (line) or not, the show must go on.

The first of these films, chronologically, is John Ford’s My Darling Clementine (1946). Having not seen many Westerns prior to this, but having been exposed to a fair amount of parody and deconstruction, it certainly was interesting to start with this completely unreconstructed example of the form, black and white in both coloration and morality.

Read Kay’s full account here.

Advertisements